A Pub at Last!

By Robert Harland

Rumor has it that a traditional British-style pub will open this year in Talisay. Let’s hope so. If it’s a success I expect we’ll soon see a pub on every street corner in Negros. Hurrah!

In Britain, most of us have a ‘local’ – that is a pub near our homes which we like to patronize to enjoy good company, good beer, a game of darts and some good old fashion pub grub.

In Britain, most of us have a ‘local’ – that is a pub near our homes which we like to patronize to enjoy good company, good beer, a game of darts and some good old fashion pub grub.

The prospect of at last having a ‘local’ at hand started me thinking about pubs back home in England.

The pub, short for public house, has been around for centuries. The title for oldest pub in Britain is hotly contested. The Guinness World Records lists the Hertfordshire pub, Ye Olde Fighting Cocks, as the oldest. It’s an 11th century structure built on an 8th century site making this ‘local’ over a thousand years old.

The largest pub in Britain is said to be The Moon Under Water in Manchester. It’s a converted movie house big enough to hold 1,700 people.

By contrast, the smallest pub is The Nutshell in Suffolk. It measures just 4.5 by 2.1 meters. The pub can manage around ten customers – 15 at a push.

The longest bar in Britain belongs to London’s Zander Bar. It’s more than 48 meters long.

And the smallest bar can be seen in The Dove, a 17th century riverside pub in London. It’s a mere 1.27m x 2.39m.

Perhaps the most bizarre pub in Britain is the 250 year-old Glynne Arms (more popularly known as The Crooked House) in the West Midlands. It suffered badly from mining subsidence and as a result leans at an angle of 15 degrees.

Too much of the coal that lies underneath the area was removed with obvious consequences. As the result of an optical illusion, without even taking a drink, beer bottles can really be seen to roll up the table.

Some years ago, the pub was shifting and sinking but buttressing prevented further damage but left it tilted some 15 degrees out of true. Doors, floors and windows all sit at odd angles to one another, causing patrons difficulty upon entering the pub and walking to the bar.

The sloping floor creates an eerie illusory sensation, making drinkers feel drunk even after only one beer.*

Advertisements